RESEARCH

RESEARCH

Research activities

CoastClim combines complementary expertise in marine ecology, biogeochemistry, and atmospheric sciences to quantify the feedbacks between coastal ecosystems and the origin and fluxes of greenhouse gases and aerosol precursors. The research activities within CoastClim include the simultaneous in situ quantification of biodiversity and biogeochemical measurements across sediment, water, air, and their interfaces in contrasting biological systems. In situ measurements are complemented by experimental work in the field and laboratory to resolve mechanisms behind the observed patterns. 

As part of the decision support, the results will be synthesized, ecosystem models developed to provide full spatial coverage, and science communicators will engage with society’s decision-making bodies to deliver advice on policy, management, and regulation.

Research activities

CoastClim combines complementary expertise in marine ecology, biogeochemistry, and atmospheric sciences to quantify the feedbacks between coastal ecosystems and the origin and fluxes of greenhouse gases and aerosol precursors. The research activities within CoastClim include the simultaneous in situ quantification of biodiversity and biogeochemical measurements across sediment, water, air, and their interfaces in contrasting biological systems. In situ measurements are complemented by experimental work in the field and laboratory to resolve mechanisms behind the observed patterns. 

As part of the decision support, the results will be synthesized, ecosystem models developed to provide full spatial coverage, and science communicators will engage with society’s decision-making bodies to deliver advice on policy, management, and regulation.

Research activities

CoastClim combines complementary expertise in marine ecology, biogeochemistry, and atmospheric sciences to quantify the feedbacks between coastal ecosystems and the origin and fluxes of greenhouse gases and aerosol precursors. The research activities within CoastClim include the simultaneous in situ quantification of biodiversity and biogeochemical measurements across sediment, water, air, and their interfaces in contrasting biological systems. In situ measurements are complemented by experimental work in the field and laboratory to resolve mechanisms behind the observed patterns. 

As part of the decision support, the results will be synthesized, ecosystem models developed to provide full spatial coverage, and science communicators will engage with society’s decision-making bodies to deliver advice on policy, management, and regulation.

Marine Ecology
Marine Biogeochemistry
Marine Ecology

Our marine ecologists quantify biodiversity descriptors of benthic and pelagic compartments of the coastal zone and link them to carbon cycling processes across spatial and temporal scales.

 


We investigate how benthic biodiversity descriptors (e.g., species and functional trait diversity, abundance, biomass, dominance of plants and fauna) in coastal soft and hard bottom communities relate to carbon cycling in time (e.g., seasonal succession) and space (e.g., organic matter enriched vs. non-enriched sediments). Some of our approaches include seasonal field surveys and habitat mapping using SCUBA, aquatic eddy covariance (AEC) and in situ incubation chambers to measure ecosystem metabolism, rapid organic matter degradation assays, and complementary laboratory experiments.


We focus on pelagic biodiversity patterns within and between trophic levels and their implications for carbon cycling across multiple temporal scales. We study species coexistence and predator-prey dynamics in plankton communities using diversity of approaches, which include offshore monitoring of plankton succession, outdoor and indoor mesocosm experiments, laboratory experiments with microalgae, analyses of time series, and structural equation models.

Marine Biogeochemistry

Our experts in marine biogeochemistry explore the coupled dynamics of carbon, nitrogen, and other elements in the coastal zone and their interactions across the sediment-water-atmosphere interfaces.


We aim to determine the principal microbial processes active in sediment cycling of carbon, nutrients (N, P) and related elements such as sulfur and iron. These processes control both the long-term storage of carbon through burial, and its transformation to dissolved forms such as CO₂ and CH₄ which can influence greenhouse gas fluxes to the atmosphere. We are also interested to determine the variable sources of carbon to coastal sediments, the impact of human activities on their relative importance over space and time, and their composition and reactivity in sediments. We do this for example through analysis of biomarker compounds by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.


We quantify how benthic and pelagic systems regulate water column biogeochemical processes, and, thereby, contribute to carbon & nitrogen capture, recycling, and atmospheric feedbacks across space and time. We use fast-response automated gas equilibrator and cavity ring-down spectroscopy systems to quantify the distribution of dissolved gases (e.g., CO₂, CH₄, and N₂O) and their respective stable isotopes in the coastal zone, and link the data to local biodiversity characteristics and physicochemical properties of seawater (e.g., temperature, salinity, nutrients, carbonate chemistry, depth, currents, waves, turbulence, turbidity).

Marine Ecology

Our marine ecologists quantify biodiversity descriptors of benthic and pelagic compartments of the coastal zone and link them to carbon cycling processes across spatial and temporal scales.


We investigate how benthic biodiversity descriptors (e.g., species and functional trait diversity, abundance, biomass, dominance of plants and fauna) in coastal soft and hard bottom communities relate to carbon cycling in time (e.g., seasonal succession) and space (e.g., organic matter enriched vs. non-enriched sediments). Some of our approaches include seasonal field surveys and habitat mapping using SCUBA, aquatic eddy covariance (AEC) and in situ incubation chambers to measure ecosystem metabolism, rapid organic matter degradation assays, and complementary laboratory experiments.


We focus on pelagic biodiversity patterns within and between trophic levels and their implications for carbon cycling across multiple temporal scales. We study species coexistence and predator-prey dynamics in plankton communities using diversity of approaches, which include offshore monitoring of plankton succession, outdoor and indoor mesocosm experiments, laboratory experiments with microalgae, analyses of time series, and structural equation models.

Marine Biogeochemistry

Our experts in marine biogeochemistry explore the coupled dynamics of carbon, nitrogen, and other elements in the coastal zone and their interactions across the sediment-water-atmosphere interfaces.


We aim to determine the principal microbial processes active in sediment cycling of carbon, nutrients (N, P) and related elements such as sulfur and iron. These processes control both the long-term storage of carbon through burial, and its transformation to dissolved forms such as CO₂ and CH₄ which can influence greenhouse gas fluxes to the atmosphere. We are also interested to determine the variable sources of carbon to coastal sediments, the impact of human activities on their relative importance over space and time, and their composition and reactivity in sediments. We do this for example through analysis of biomarker compounds by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.


We quantify how benthic and pelagic systems regulate water column biogeochemical processes, and, thereby, contribute to carbon & nitrogen capture, recycling, and atmospheric feedbacks across space and time. We use fast-response automated gas equilibrator and cavity ring-down spectroscopy systems to quantify the distribution of dissolved gases (e.g., CO₂, CH₄, and N₂O) and their respective stable isotopes in the coastal zone, and link the data to local biodiversity characteristics and physicochemical properties of seawater (e.g., temperature, salinity, nutrients, carbonate chemistry, depth, currents, waves, turbulence, turbidity).

Atmospheric Sciences
Decision Support
Atmospheric Sciences

Our atmospheric scientists study biosphere-atmosphere interactions that include aerosol particle formation and greenhouse gas fluxes to confine the carbon sink capacity of coastal ecosystems.


We aim to quantify the spatiotemporal variability of greenhouse gas sources/sinks in coastal ecosystems and to understand key processes controlling the gas exchange at the air-water interface. We use fixed and mobile atmospheric flux towers, equipped with eddy covariance systems for measuring surface fluxes of momentum, energy (sensible and latent heat) and gases (CO₂, CH₄, COS).


We aim to understand how the coastal/marine environment contributes to the formation of atmospheric aerosol by quantifying the emissions of precursors, their atmospheric chemistry, and the mechanisms through which they form particles. We combine measurements of gas phase species, mainly utilizing chemical ionization mass spectrometry, with detailed aerosol size distributions down to the smallest clusters.

Decision Support

Our group of ecosystem modelers and science communicators will use the collected data to quantify the dynamics of interconnecting processes and engage with society’s decision-making bodies to deliver advice on policy, management, and regulation.


Our modelling approach falls into two, interconnected strands of research: i) process modeling for understanding limiting factors and interdependencies that control the generation, transportation and transformation of carbon in its different forms across the sediment-water-air interface and ii) employ various models and tools to integrate total effects and magnitudes over larger spatial and temporal scales. A relatively wide array of models for specific purposes are readily available, e.g., sediment reactive-transport model, 3D high-resolution coastal model, biogeochemical and benthic fauna sub-models, and it is foreseen that a major effort is needed to integrate models for different components in order to quantify the net ecosystem fluxes. Models for several specific vital ecosystem functions are still lacking and will be developed and validated against measured processes and states.


We will at bridge the gap between science and policy by analyzing, synthesizing and communicating relevant research results to the right stakeholders in society at the right time. Based on analysis of ongoing policy processes, working methods such as webinars, debate articles, dialogues etc. will be used for reaching the target.

Atmospheric Sciences

Our atmospheric scientists study biosphere-atmosphere interactions that include aerosol particle formation and greenhouse gas fluxes to confine the carbon sink capacity of coastal ecosystems.


We aim to quantify the spatiotemporal variability of greenhouse gas sources/sinks in coastal ecosystems and to understand key processes controlling the gas exchange at the air-water interface. We use fixed and mobile atmospheric flux towers, equipped with eddy covariance systems for measuring surface fluxes of momentum, energy (sensible and latent heat) and gases (CO₂, CH₄, COS).


We aim to understand how the coastal/marine environment contributes to the formation of atmospheric aerosol by quantifying the emissions of precursors, their atmospheric chemistry, and the mechanisms through which they form particles. We combine measurements of gas phase species, mainly utilizing chemical ionization mass spectrometry, with detailed aerosol size distributions down to the smallest clusters.

Decision Support

Our group of ecosystem modelers and science communicators will use the collected data to quantify the dynamics of interconnecting processes and engage with society’s decision-making bodies to deliver advice on policy, management, and regulation.


Our modelling approach falls into two, interconnected strands of research: i) process modeling for understanding limiting factors and interdependencies that control the generation, transportation and transformation of carbon in its different forms across the sediment-water-air interface and ii) employ various models and tools to integrate total effects and magnitudes over larger spatial and temporal scales. A relatively wide array of models for specific purposes are readily available, e.g., sediment reactive-transport model, 3D high-resolution coastal model, biogeochemical and benthic fauna sub-models, and it is foreseen that a major effort is needed to integrate models for different components in order to quantify the net ecosystem fluxes. Models for several specific vital ecosystem functions are still lacking and will be developed and validated against measured processes and states.


We will at bridge the gap between science and policy by analyzing, synthesizing and communicating relevant research results to the right stakeholders in society at the right time. Based on analysis of ongoing policy processes, working methods such as webinars, debate articles, dialogues etc. will be used for reaching the target.